Bacchus

Bacchus is a white wine grape that originated in Germany, a cross between Silvaner, Riesling, and Müller-Thurgau, developed in the early 20th century. It thrives in cooler climates, where it can fully express its aromatic potential, often producing wines with a distinctive, pronounced floral and fruity bouquet. Typical aromas include elderflower, herbs, and green fruits like apple and gooseberry, with some notes of exotic fruits in warmer vintages. Bacchus wines are known for their refreshing acidity and can range from dry to off-dry, making them versatile for pairing with a variety of dishes. This grape has gained popularity in England, contributing significantly to the English wine renaissance, where it produces exceptionally aromatic and lively wines, ideal for enjoying young.